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Melancholy Monday: sad songs

February 10, 2014 Leave a comment Go to comments

When I first heard this song, I wept. Even today as I sat in my office and listened to it once more before pressing “Publish”, my eyes welled up and I found myself holding back the tears.

Why?

Ben Folds’ pensive tune, Still Fighting It, is all about a man recognizing what it means and how it feels to be the father of a young boy who will, all too quickly, grow up. As it happens, Ben did, in fact, write this wonderfully reflective song for his son, so the emotions you hear and feel are all real. And though he did write it for his son, I think it applies universally to anyone who is a parent. My favorite line, and the most poignant, is this all to true observation:

And you’re so much like me I’m sorry

–dp

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  1. February 10, 2014 at 12:52 pm

    Wonderful song!

    • February 10, 2014 at 1:02 pm

      Glad you liked it, Carrie.

  2. February 10, 2014 at 1:34 pm

    Oof, that’s a great song. I love Ben Folds but am not familiar with all of his music, so this was new to me. I am enjoying the music of Melancholy Mondays so far!

    I’ll share two more of my favorites today: Duncan Sheik – Reasons For Living (no video, just music): http://youtu.be/nt5pA9yrMGw

    Florence + The Machine – What The Water Gave Me (video doesn’t add much): http://youtu.be/am6rArVPip8

    (Pretty much any song by either of those artists will give you intense emotions.)

    • February 13, 2014 at 9:47 am

      Yeah, Ben Folds is pretty awesome. If you’re a fan of his, have you watched “The Sing-off”. He’s one of the judges on show where they choose and judge various a cappella groups. As far as I’m concerned, he’s the best judge on the panel. Anyway …

      Great songs you passed along. I’d never heard of Duncan Sheik. The lyrics to this one were thought provoking and fit perfectly with the melancholy theme. I’ve heard of Florence + The Machine before but I’d never listened to any of their music. This was one of those songs where I really wanted to understand what the words were all about. I looked up the song and found that Florence had this to say about when she was writing it: “When I was writing this song I was thinking a lot about all those people who’ve lost their lives in vain attempts to save their loved ones from drowning.”

      Wow. If that doesn’t paint a picture of the mood for this song, what does?

      Thanks for joining me on Melancholy Mondays, Nicole. Love hearing your thoughts and about new songs.

  3. lannyjane
    February 10, 2014 at 1:35 pm

    I love that Ben Folds song. I listened to it a lot when Elijah was first born. But a roast beef combo part always makes me giggle a little.

    Erin Warkentin

    >

    • February 10, 2014 at 9:25 pm

      I’ve listened to this song many times since Jonathan first told me about it. Always affected me the same way. Funny thing, as I told him today, we are both on opposite sides of where Ben Folds was when he wrote this song. I’ve got the grown up son, he’s got the young boy. I think all parents look at their children and hope, secretly perhaps, that they don’t inherit any of bad that we all know we have in ourselves. Or maybe I’m just weird :-)_

  4. February 10, 2014 at 4:33 pm

    A very nice tune! How true it all is. My son will turn 37 this March, and we’re still very close. His two wonderful sons–my grandsons–allow me to re-live those father/son times we made together all those years ago! Thanks for sharing, Dave.

    • February 10, 2014 at 9:28 pm

      My oldest daughter turns 32 this year, while my oldest son hits the 31 year mark, so I can relate to having children grow up. This year, I will be blessed with grandchildren numbers 7 and 8 (on a girl, the other unknown until they are born in May). I love my grandchildren, but I’ve got to say there are many times I wish I could go back to when they were toddlers, if even for just a moment.

  5. February 10, 2014 at 4:55 pm

    Wow, what a beautiful song, Dave and the video…I’m glad I had some Kleenex handy. Thanks for sharing.

    • February 10, 2014 at 9:30 pm

      I’m glad you liked it, Jill. Special song for me, as I think it is for all parents, whether your kids are young or old.

  6. February 11, 2014 at 5:33 am

    Wonderful song to share, Dave. It makes me think of my oldest nephew. He has joint custody of his two sons (9 and 10 yrs old). I think the father-son relationship is particularly poignant when you’re a single dad.

    • February 11, 2014 at 9:14 pm

      Hi Marie – thanks for commenting. I can’t even imagine what it would be like to be a single dad. What a hard thing to have to do …

  7. February 13, 2014 at 11:02 am

    Your son is lucky to have such a caring dad!

  8. February 13, 2014 at 1:34 pm

    Thanks, Eric. After all the years go by and you reflect on your life as a parent, you hope that your kids have fond memories. So far, I think that’s true 🙂

  9. February 16, 2014 at 8:21 pm

    This song always makes me cry, as well as 2 others of Ben’s – Landed and The Luckiest. The line you quoted is the one that always gets to me, reminding me of my 3 children, especially my oldest daughter who is “so much like me”, in all those good and bad ways. Great post.

    • February 17, 2014 at 7:59 pm

      I know … isn’t that line a killer. I don’t think there’s a parent alive who wouldn’t cry hearing a line like that. Love Ben Folds, and had heard “The Luckiest”. Beautiful, beautiful song … Never heard “Landed” before. Checked it out. Great song. Loved it. After I listened to it I went searching for the lyrics to see if I could understand what it was about. Turns out Ben explained a while back, and upon reading it, the lyrics make perfect sense.

      Here’s the literal interpretation of the song from Ben:

      “It’s about a close friend of mine who’s recovering from being under the influence of a crazy girlfriend,” says Folds. “I had this mental image of him flying back to reality, landing at the airport and needing a ride back to the life he left behind.”

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